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November 2021

Tuesday, 30 November 2021 00:00

The Three Types of Orthotics

Orthotics are special shoe inserts that are designed to help correct a variety of foot related issues by relieving pressure or realigning the feet. They can also help reduce pain in the feet, knees, and lower back. There are three common types of orthotics known as soft, rigid, and semi-rigid. Soft orthotics are made to provide extra cushioning while the foot is planted on the ground. Semi-rigid orthotics, which are often used on flat feet, are designed to provide both cushioning and stability. Meanwhile, rigid orthotics are designed to provide stability and to help prevent movements that can cause pain. Patients who believe that orthotics are right for them should visit a podiatrist. A podiatrist will be able to customize an orthotic and tailor it to your needs.

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Dawn Miles, DPM from Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Palatka and Saint Augustine, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Orthotics
Tuesday, 30 November 2021 00:00

Foot Orthotics

Orthotics are shoe inserts that are meant to correct an irregular walking gait or provide cushioning to the feet.  Orthotics come in a variety of different models and sizes, including over-the-counter and customizable variants. Customizable orthotics can be shaped and contoured to fit inside a specific shoe and are typically prescribed through a podiatrist who specializes in customized footwear and orthotics design and management.

Orthotics are beneficial because they can help prevent injuries from occurring and provide cushioning to keep pain levels down to a minimum. They also allow for the correct positioning of the feet. Orthotics can act as shock absorbers to help remove pressure from the foot and ankle. Therefore, orthotics can make bodily movements, such as walking and running, become more comfortable as well as help prevent the development of certain foot conditions.

Orthotics alleviate pain and make the foot more comfortable by slightly altering the angle at which the foot strikes the ground surface, therefore controlling the movement of the foot and ankle. Orthotics come in different variants and can be made of various materials. To determine what type of orthotic is most suited to your feet and your needs, it is best to consult your podiatrist. He or she will be able to recommend a type of orthotic that can help improve your foot function or prescribe a custom orthotic to best fit your feet.  

Running may seem like a simple to do. However, running is actually a complex movement that puts stress on the ligaments, bones, and joints of the body.  Selecting the correct running shoe is important for increasing performance and avoiding risk of injury.  Running shoes should be selected based on your foot type.  Considerations such as trail versus road shoes are important. Your foot type dictates the degree of cushioning, stability and motion control you require.  The most accurate way to learn your foot type is to visit a local shop that specializes in running shoes.  Professionals can measure your arch type, stride and gait and help you with your shoe needs.

The design of running shoes is created around the idea of pronation.  Pronation is the natural rolling movement of your ankle from the outside to inside when your foot strikes the ground.  If you run properly you strike the ground on the outside of your heel and roll in the direction of your big toe before pushing off once more.  Pronation is beneficial because it assists the lower half of your body in absorbing shock and storing energy.  Those considered neutral runners pronate correctly and do not need running shoes that help correct their form.  Neutral runners can choose from a wide variety of shoes, including barefoot or minimal types.  However, those who have arch problems or who adopt an incorrect form while running may experience too much or too little pronation. They may require running shoes that offer additional support.

Those who overpronate experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling.  Even while standing, those who severely overpronate display ankles that are angled inward.  It is not uncommon for them to have flat feet or curved legs.  The tendency to overpronate may cause many injuries.  Areas that tend to become injured are the knees, ankles, and Achilles tendon.  If you find that you have a tendency to overpronate, you should look at shoes that provide extra stability and motion-control.  Motion-control shoes are straight and firm. Shoes of this type do not curve at the tip.  The restricted flexibility along the middle of the shoe prohibits the foot from rolling too far inward as your foot strikes the ground.

A less common problem is underpronation.  Underpronation, also called supination, is when the feet are unable to roll inward during landing.  Those who underpronate have feet that lack flexibility and high arches.  This prevents any kind of shock absorption, even though it does place less rotational stress on ankles and knees.  This added force can cause fractures, ligament tears, and muscle strains because the legs are trying to compensate for the impact.  Those who underpronate need shoes with more cushioning and flexibility.  If you have a tendency to underpronate, selecting stability or motion-control shoes may cause you more problems by continuing to prevent pronation.

Tuesday, 23 November 2021 00:00

What Kind of Running Shoes Do I Need?

There are many running shoes available on the market, and they can usually be classified into five different types of shoes: motion control, stability, cushioned, lightweight, and trail. Motion control running shoes are designed to reduce any excessive rolling in your gait while you run and provide extra shock absorption. These shoes are especially useful for someone with an overpronated gait. Stability running shoes are designed to stop excess motion in the foot and ankle. Cushioned running shoes absorb shock and help protect the feet. Lightweight running shoes are more flexible and can decrease pain and fatigue while running. Trail shoes are designed to help you run on rugged terrain. They are usually more durable and have a better grip than other types of running shoes. To find out which running shoes may be best for you, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist. 

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact Dawn Miles, DPM from Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Palatka and Saint Augustine, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

Plantar fasciitis can occur when the ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, known as the plantar fascia, becomes inflamed or torn. The most common sign of plantar fasciitis is pain and swelling in the heel that is worse in the morning or after standing for long periods of time. As patients get older, the plantar fascia loses its ability to stretch, and the fat pad of the heel begins to wear. This results in a higher risk of developing plantar fasciitis. Other factors for developing plantar fasciitis include being overweight and having high arches or tight calf muscles. Patients who believe that they have plantar fasciitis should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dawn Miles, DPM  from Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Palatka and Saint Augustine, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes. When this band of connective tissue becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis occurs. Fortunately, this condition is treatable.

There are several factors that may put you at a greater risk for developing plantar fasciitis. One of the biggest factors is age; plantar fasciitis is common in those between the ages of 40 to 60. People who have jobs that require them to be on their feet are also likely to develop plantar fasciitis. This includes factory workers, teachers, and others who spend a large portion of their day walking around on hard surfaces. Another risk factor is obesity because excess weight can result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

People with plantar fasciitis often experience a stabbing pain in the heel area. This pain is usually at its worst in the morning, but can also be triggered by periods of standing or sitting. Plantar fasciitis may make it hard to run and walk. It may also make the foot feel stiff and sensitive, which consequently makes walking barefoot difficult.

Treatment for plantar fasciitis depends on the severity of the specific case of the condition. Ice massage applications may be used to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy is often used to treat plantar fasciitis, and this may include stretching exercises. Another treatment option is anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen.

If you suspect that you have plantar fasciitis, meet with your podiatrist immediately. If left untreated, symptoms may lead to tearing and overstretching of the plantar fascia. The solution is early detection and treatment. Be sure to speak with your podiatrist if you are experiencing heel pain.

Wednesday, 10 November 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

Ankle Pain

Pain experienced in the ankle can be caused by a multitude of conditions. While the most common cause is an ankle sprain, other possible problems can include arthritis, gout, ankle instability, ankle fracture, nerve compression, or tendinitis. In more serious cases, ankle pain can be a sign of improper alignment of the foot or an infection.

Ankle pain can often be accompanied by symptoms such as redness, swelling, stiffness and warm in the affected area. Pain can be described differently depending on the condition; short, stabbing pain and a dull ache are some examples. If such symptoms are persistent and do not improve after time, be sure to schedule an appointment with your local podiatrist.

Depending on the condition behind your ankle pain, different treatments may be prescribed by your podiatrist. For ankle sprains, the first step in treatment involves rest, ice, elevation, and compression. Be sure to avoid placing pressure on the ankle, use an ice pack several times a day, and use a compression bandage and elevation to reduce swelling. Other more serious conditions may require the assistance of certain drugs and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physical therapy, or even cortisone injections.

Consult with your foot and ankle doctor to best determine the cause of your ankle pain and the appropriate treatment. Depending on the severity of your ankle pain and the condition behind it, recovery from ankle pain may take some time.

Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

Why Is My Ankle in Pain?

Ankle pain can be caused by a variety of factors. For instance, you may have an ankle sprain or fracture. Ankle sprains occur when ligaments that support the ankle get stretched or torn, and fractures are actual breaks in one or more bones that make up the ankle joint. Pain in the ankle may also be caused by gout, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and other types of arthritis which affect the ankle joint. There are other conditions such as nerve injuries, heel injuries, and blockages in blood vessels that may produce ankle pain. Pain due to tarsal tunnel syndrome (a compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel) can be felt anywhere along the nerve, including the ankle. There may be painful damage to the cartilage or tendons in the ankle. If you are feeling pain in your ankle, get your condition evaluated and diagnosed by a podiatrist who can also create a treatment plan based on their findings.

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Dawn Miles, DPM from Florida. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Palatka and Saint Augustine, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Ankle Pain
Tuesday, 02 November 2021 00:00

All About Cuboid Syndrome

Though cuboid syndrome predominately affects athletes, non-athletes can suffer from it too. Cuboid syndrome is also called cuboid subluxation or cuboid fault syndrome, and occurs when a joint or ligament near the cuboid bone of the foot becomes damaged, or when the bone itself is dislodged from its natural position. Pain may be persistent, or come and go, and it is usually marked by the outside of the foot. Cuboid syndrome, unless severe, can be difficult to diagnose. A doctor will likely ask questions about how long the pain has been present, and will apply pressure on the cuboid bone to determine the origin of pain.

There are a number of causes that can lead to the syndrome. Due to athletic activities, repeated stress placed on the foot can cause cuboid subluxation. Ballet dancers, runners, and other athletes often develop this condition. Basketball or tennis players may also develop this condition, as they place stress on their feet while moving side to side. Cuboid syndrome can often develop over time; however it can come out of a sudden injury as well. Over pronation, or other problems with feet, can exacerbate the condition if not corrected.

Among podiatrists, there is some disagreement about the treatment, as well as the definition of cuboid syndrome. Some see the injury as an injury to the ligaments located nearby the cuboid bone, while others believe it refers to the dislocation of the calcaneal-cuboid joint only. Treatment opinions differ as well. Although it can be treated by manipulation in order to reposition the bone, this must be done with extreme care in order to avoid injury. Some doctors, however, prefer treatment through the use of orthotic pads, designed to keep the bone in its place. Effectiveness of these treatments may vary, according to the severity of the injury.

When you experience side foot pain, it is important that you seek medical assistance. If a subluxed cuboid is caught and treated early, treatment is usually successful, and individuals may begin activities such as sports when the pain subsides. If left untreated, the pain will worsen, and the condition could cause permanent damage.

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